Fusion Plasma Research
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Outline
Numerical EXperiment of Tokamak (NEXT) Project
The main objectives of the NEXT project are
(1) to understand complex physical processes in present-days and next-generation tokamak plasmas,
(2) to predict and evaluate the plasma performance of tokamak reactors, such as JT-60SA and ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor),
(3) to contribute to the progress in plasma physics and related research areas via the computer simulation.

What's NEXT
The NEXT (Numerical EXperiment of Tokamak) project is directed at understanding the complex properties of fusion plasmas and predicting the physical processes in the next generation of tokamaks, such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), using recently advanced computer resources. To achieve our programme, we are developing numerical simulation codes which are applicable for prediction of properties of the core plasma and the divertor plasma on equal footing (see fig).
For core plasmas, the main interest is in the analysis of complex MHD and transport phenomenon. Simulation codes have been developed based on three models; a particle model, a fluid model, and a particle/fluid hybrid model, some of which are using the gyro-kinetic technique [1]. Simulation codes [2] for dense and cold divertor plasmas are being developed with particle and fluid models, combined with Monte Carlo techniques for neutrals and impurities. Such codes are bing executed on massively parallel computers.
The NEXT programme is incorporated with other fields where complex plasma behavior plays a crucial role, such as in astrophysics, accelerator plasmas, and laser plasmas. The NEXT project involves research in parallel computing technology and in the architecture of massively parallel computers.
[1] S. Tokuda, J. Plasma and Fusion Research, 72, 916 (1996).
[2] K. Shimizu and T. Takizuka, J. Plasma and Fusion Research, 72, 909 (1996).